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Monday, November 17th, 2017 – This DailyGrit Live episode is with someone who specialises in making dreams come true, Darren Lomman – entrepreneur, social innovator, public speaker, human-centered design and engineering specialist!

From making personal dreams come true, Darren is now on a mission to make oceans cleaner and to reduce plastic waste in Western Australia.

Watch his full interview below and find out what Green Batch is and how you can help keep plastic waste in our oceans.

EP005: If you saw something wrong, would you change it? with Darren Lomman – The No Xcuses Show

Posted by Brant Garvey

[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″ shape_divider_position=”bottom”][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” column_border_radius=”none” width=”1/1″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_column_text][smart_track_player url=”http://media.blubrry.com/dailygrit/content.blubrry.com/dailygrit/DailyGrit_LIVE_Ep_004_Featuring_Guest_Julia_Wheeler.mp3″ image=”https://mlt3mzmowbkm.i.optimole.com/w:auto/h:auto/q:75/http://brantgarvey.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/11/Julia-Wheeler.png” social_linkedin=”true” social_pinterest=”true” social_email=”true” ][/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row type=”in_container” full_screen_row_position=”middle” scene_position=”center” text_color=”dark” text_align=”left” overlay_strength=”0.3″ shape_divider_position=”bottom”][vc_column column_padding=”no-extra-padding” column_padding_position=”all” background_color_opacity=”1″ background_hover_color_opacity=”1″ column_shadow=”none” column_border_radius=”none” width=”1/1″ tablet_text_alignment=”default” phone_text_alignment=”default” column_border_width=”none” column_border_style=”solid”][vc_column_text]Time Stamped Show Notes

00:00     This was supposed to happen on Monday, but we had technical difficulties. So now we’re coming on site here with Darren Lomman who has the company or the not-for-profit Green Batch which is focused around making sure that there is more fish in the ocean than plastic by 2050. Just take a moment and let’s introduce you and what you’re about and why we’re sitting down here in Perth City surrounded in a bunch of plastic.

00:26     Well right on here we are showing that we are generating this plastic every single day. I heard an advert a while ago that said by 2050 there’ll be more plastic in our ocean than fish.

00:40     Just stop and think about that for a second. More plastic than fish. Our oceans are really bloody big. (It’s ridiculous) There’s a lot of fish. But there’s going to be even more plastic. Our fish will go swimming around fish in this load of stuff very very soon.

00:58     So this is just a sample of what our oceans will look like very very soon.

01:00     And I mean it is already quite drastic how much plastic is currently in our oceans at this point let alone what is going to get to by then.

01:06     You know what, every second, 15 hundred bottles get poured into our landfills from our oceans.

01:14     Every second… so in ten seconds that’s fifteen thousand bottles. (That’s ridiculous) Do you have an idea how much that is, that’s hard to fathom. Every hour, if we collect those bottle up, it’s enough to fill up 240 Trans Perth buses. So imagine a convoy. 240 buses long, rocking up to Cottlesloe Beach and pouring their contents of plastic out in the ocean. Every hour. 24 hours a day. Seven days a week. 365 days a year. Forever, ongoing. That is what we’re doing to our planet right now!

01:48     It’s just crazy! And Darren, rather than being someone that sees an issue, he also is a doer. He saw the problem and he wanted to find a solution. How did you stumble across that?

02:00     Well, it was actually by accident. When I heard about this I thought, WA is such a beautiful city. We are really fortunate to live in one of the most beautiful places in the world. Look at our beaches, they are amazing! You don’t see plastic. You come down to the Perth City mall and there’s none of them… other than here right now. (Other than what we’ve set up) There’s no plastic anywhere.  What’s WA is doing that’s so great compared to the rest of the world. What can the rest of the world can learn from us.

02:24     I’ve been recycling since I was a kid… you’ve been recycling as majority of the population. So I started to find out what we were doing. I started researching and I couldn’t find anyone that was actually doing the reprocessing. The people were collecting the rubbish and sorting it, but there was no one reprocessing them. So I went out to the recycling facilities and asked, “What are you doing when you collect these? Where do you send it to?” They could not give me a single name or address or business in WA that actually does any reprocessing.

02:56     You couldn’t find a straight answer, so then you actually discovered that a lot of it gets sold to be burned. Is that correct?

03:04     So when they collect all the stuff from our recycling bins they sort it, and then it’s turned on to another party who then in turn sells it. And they will sell it to anyone that will buy it.

03:15     As a money making thing…

03:16     As a money making thing… We don’t dump it at our ocean. It’s a commercial thing. These companies are designed to make money. Now dumping it in a landfill actually cost them money and they pay levies so they don’t do it. Dumping them in oceans, well that’s free but they don’t make money, and there’s a lot of competitions there, so it just gets sold to anyone who will buy it. The only people who will buy it. There are two categories of people who will buy it – those who reprocesses, that actually genuinely recycle it, and there’s those that goes to wastes and incinerators.

03:45     Globally, 1 to 2% of our plastic actually gets reprocessed. (1 to 2%, ridiculous!) The other 98% – oceans, landfills, wastes and incinerators.

03:57     You got a thousand bottles here, 980 of them, just purely by basic statistics are not going to be recycled.

04:05     Yeah, that just goes to show … this is just a small sample and most of it going to end up as pollution.

04:12     What’s so important about this week, and why are we set up here? I’ll give you a full shot of where we’re at. We’re in the middle of Perth (in Forrest Place), why are we here today?

04:28     Well a couple of things – this week is actually Recycling Week (so very relevant).  Very relevant to what we are doing. We’re supposed to be celebrating Recycling Week (just what we do in Western Australia) Like there’s something to brag about our zero reprocessing… but it is also last month we launched a crowdfunding campaign to set up WA’s first reprocessing plant.

04:54     We had an amazing response from the public. We have raised over $60,000 in just under a month.

05:01     $60,000 in under a month… that is absolutely phenomenal!

05:13     Just what we need, more plastic. So that first 50,000 has helped us to set up this program. We can now roll out into 50 schools to start their collection. In our pilot schools we are running this, and then we continued the crowdfunding to get further $8,000 which helps us get a machine, using air to separate these labels from the bottles. You look at these labels, a lot of manual labour because we’ve been removing them by hand. Now we got the funds to have the machine and then two nights ago we hit that target, so we released the next target. If you have a look here, these bottles have labels, also got lids and these little rings. Now if we have to remove hundreds and thousands of it, that’s a lot of work. We can actually remove them using water. When we shred it down, we get all these particles, the lids and the little rings float in the water and the PET sinks down. That’s $5,000… now we are up to 60, now we have $3,000 left, I think it’s $2,500 the last I look. So $2,500 and we can get that machine. The campaign closes at 9:00 PM tonight… that is the deadline. We got 9 hours left to do this. (9 hours to get how much?) 2 and half grand to get all of these… it’s hardly anything.

06:32     9 hours left to get the next part guys. LIke I said, Darren sees problems, like labels, and finds the solution… like the lids, finds the solution on how to separate them. He wants to do this and implement them in scale. He wants to have them in schools, so people collecting them in schools and having these systems in the schools to be able to repurpose it to use it for…

06:54     Yeah, well that’s the first product we are making out of this PET is actully 3D printer filament. Now 3D printer filament is a consumable that goes into a 3D printer. And by doing that, it means when the kids are actually printing stuff on the 3D printers in their schools, they are actually printing out of recycled bottles. Whereas at the moment they’re just buying more plastic and adding to this. We want to flip that around and actually get them working with us solving this, and consuming this stuff, rather than adding to it.

07:26     Consuming this to be able to make more amazing things that can be used to help the world rather than hinder it.

07:32     Absolutely. We are after the support of WA. We have more steps to close that. This is happening. We’re gonna keep fighting for this. Whether it rains or not, we’re gonna pursue and make this happen because whether it rains or not, people are still buying water bottles. We want people to reduce the amount of plastic they use, but it’s not just water bottles. There’s a mix here, like this fruit and veg tray… there’s a frozen dinner tray. So this is PET plastic. You’ve got your bakery stuff from your supermarket. There’s literally thousands of products… there’s a window cleaner there… there’s all sorts of stuff.

08:15     Plastic is not going away anytime soon. There are businesses behind it. It’s cheaper for Coca-Cola to send plastic than glass. Unfortunately that’s a huge momentum to change the entire plastic across the whole. Yes, we want to address the amount of plastic, in the meantime we have to be reprocessing the stuff that they are doing and using right now. And to me, I think it is absolutely unacceptable that we, as a wealthy, good state of West Australia, just offload our rubbish to people like China and make it their problem. I think that’s a cop out.

08:53     Which is burning it and then making it our problem globally anyway. I mean like I said guys it’s a fantastic initiative to help reduce the amount of plastic that gets left around the world. To be able to repurpose it to help kids make amazing things. Darren is taking it on himself. He’s managed to get some massive support. Like we said, the crowdfunding campaign finishes tonight at 9:00 PM. We’re two and a half grand shy was that right? Two and a half grand shy of hitting the next target.  To be able to separate the lids and the little ring across the top of the bottle. Fantastic! Please share this with everyone. Get behind Darren and he’s Green Batch cause and let’s reduce the amount of unrecycled plastic in Western Australia. Thank you so much for tuning in. Thank you so much for your time Darren.

09:42     Thank you for coming in and joining me in this pile of plastic and I hope that very very soon we’ll just have some 3D printed film instead…

09:52     Exactly! And we’ve managed to get a few people to support us just locally here in Forrest Place in the city of Perth to next time guys. I’ll see you then.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]